STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.

Sarah Booth: Welcomed Chaos With No Expectations

January 09, 2023 Season 8 Episode 1
Sarah Booth: Welcomed Chaos With No Expectations
STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.
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STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.
Sarah Booth: Welcomed Chaos With No Expectations
Jan 09, 2023 Season 8 Episode 1

Let us know what you enjoy about the show!

My next guest is a Canadian born Sarah Booth, a classically trained actor who is currently starring as Yvette Nichol in the Prime Video adaptation of Louise Penny's Three Pines books.

Chances are you’ve seen her in numerous other tv worlds including guest starring on Law & Order: SVU, Star Trek: Discovery and Heartland . Trained in Montreal, she continues to work on stage as well, including her critically acclaimed performance as Una in Blackbird. She was recently awarded 2022 ACTRA's Best Female Performance for Last Call and in 2018 was the recipient of the Breakthrough Artist of the Year award. She used to save the day in Universal Studios Waterworld live stunt show and challenges her adventurous spirit with horseback riding, running and fitness.

In this episode Lisa & Sarah talk about living life as an adventure, the meaning of vulnerability , emotional triggers in real life and as tools for acting and so much more!

Follow Sarah on Instagram
https://linktr.ee/sarahfilmbooth

Support the Show.

TAKE YOUR MINDFULNESS & INSIGHTS ONE STEP FURTHER WITH PREMIUM MEDITATIONS

Subscribe to premium content today and have access to bonus episodes worksheets and meditations. Whether you are looking to relax, recenter, reduce stress, increase motivation, fall asleep peacefully or wakeup ready to take on the day, these meditations and visualizations are for you.

You will also have the opportunity to connect directly with me via email to let me know what kind of meditations you are looking for, share your episode insights and suggest guests that you might be interested in hearing from so that I can create content for you!

Subscriptions begin at $3/month and subscribers who choose $10 a month subscription also receive a monthly coaching exercise from my client workbook.

Interested in finding out more about working with Lisa Hopkins?
Visit www.wideopenstages.com
Follow Lisa https://www.instagram.com/wideopenstages/

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Show Notes Transcript

Let us know what you enjoy about the show!

My next guest is a Canadian born Sarah Booth, a classically trained actor who is currently starring as Yvette Nichol in the Prime Video adaptation of Louise Penny's Three Pines books.

Chances are you’ve seen her in numerous other tv worlds including guest starring on Law & Order: SVU, Star Trek: Discovery and Heartland . Trained in Montreal, she continues to work on stage as well, including her critically acclaimed performance as Una in Blackbird. She was recently awarded 2022 ACTRA's Best Female Performance for Last Call and in 2018 was the recipient of the Breakthrough Artist of the Year award. She used to save the day in Universal Studios Waterworld live stunt show and challenges her adventurous spirit with horseback riding, running and fitness.

In this episode Lisa & Sarah talk about living life as an adventure, the meaning of vulnerability , emotional triggers in real life and as tools for acting and so much more!

Follow Sarah on Instagram
https://linktr.ee/sarahfilmbooth

Support the Show.

TAKE YOUR MINDFULNESS & INSIGHTS ONE STEP FURTHER WITH PREMIUM MEDITATIONS

Subscribe to premium content today and have access to bonus episodes worksheets and meditations. Whether you are looking to relax, recenter, reduce stress, increase motivation, fall asleep peacefully or wakeup ready to take on the day, these meditations and visualizations are for you.

You will also have the opportunity to connect directly with me via email to let me know what kind of meditations you are looking for, share your episode insights and suggest guests that you might be interested in hearing from so that I can create content for you!

Subscriptions begin at $3/month and subscribers who choose $10 a month subscription also receive a monthly coaching exercise from my client workbook.

Interested in finding out more about working with Lisa Hopkins?
Visit www.wideopenstages.com
Follow Lisa https://www.instagram.com/wideopenstages/

Lisa Hopkins:

This is the stop time podcast. I'm your host, Lisa Hopkins, and I'm here to engage you in thought provoking motivational conversations around practicing the art of living in the moment. I'm a certified life coach, and I'm excited to dig deep and offer insights into embracing who we are and where we are at. So my next guest is a Canadian born classically trained actor, who is currently starring as Yvette Nicole in the Prime Video adaptation of Louise Penny's Three Pines books. Chances are you've seen her in numerous other TV worlds, including guest starring on law and order, Star Trek Discovery and Heartland trained in Montreal. She continues to work on stage as well, including her critically acclaimed performances as una and Blackbird. She was recently awarded the 22 actors Best Female Performance for last call, and in 2018, was the recipient of the breakthrough Artist of the Year Award. She used to save the day in Universal Studios, Waterworld live stunt show, and challenges her adventurous spirit with horseback riding, running and fitness. It is my great pleasure to introduce you all today and for myself to get to know Sarah booth. Welcome, Sarah. Hello, nice to meet you. It's great to meet you. So again, thanks so much, so much for taking the time to join me. You're pretty busy girl these days.

Sarah Booth:

It has been really busy. But I gotta say I am enjoying every moment soaking it up. For sure.

Lisa Hopkins:

Good for you. I mean the time, right? Yeah. Well, that's I mean, literally. I mean, you know, since you're a self proclaimed adventurous spirit, why don't we just jump in? And I'm gonna ask you. Well, first of all, congratulations on the on the huge success of the show. I mean, it just was just released. I know, it's so prevalent in your life right now. Yeah. But I'm so so curious. Like, what is the biggest challenge you've faced with this new milestone of success in your career?

Sarah Booth:

Oh, man, that's a great question. Because it's so fresh. I feel like because the first two episodes just came out. And they, you know, we still got, we still got three more weeks of fun. I think so far. It's just been a lot of soaking up and not yet like taking action. But I think after the holidays, I'll definitely have to have, you know, some good team meetings with my agents. And just kind of decide, what do we want to do next? Where can this take us? Did it open doors, did it not? So I think the decision making will probably be the hardest thing because prior to this, I've been auditioning for everything. People say, Oh, do you say no to things? You, Pat? I'm like, no, no, no, no, I'm still in the situation that I'm auditioning for everything. I'm really trying to build my career. So we'll see if that shift happens. And if it does, I'm sure my indecisive soul will be very terrified.

Lisa Hopkins:

Thank you for sharing that. I mean, it is so interesting. And I'm really hearing, hearing this awareness that there's a there's a lot of possibility here potentially. Right. And that there'll be certain action items that you know, that as you know, as performing artists that are sort of sort of obvious, right? I mean, suddenly, there's new, like, things that you should be doing based on this. Right. There's action items to be done.

Sarah Booth:

Yeah, exactly. Yeah. And also, this character that I play, she's quite light, she has a comedic aspect to her. But the body of my work is very dark, high states. Drama. So it will be interesting for people to discover me in this comedic role and then be able to look at the rest of my work. And you know, hopefully have like a whoa moment. You know, hopefully.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Are you having a woah moment? Like, are you did you surprise yourself?

Sarah Booth:

Yeah. I never thought I would play this role ever.

Lisa Hopkins:

Interesting. So what have you What have you learned so far like that so much in that? Wait, let's go back. Why did you never think that you would play a role like this?

Sarah Booth:

I never thought I would play a role like this. Because when I received the break down, the casting director that was casting, she knows me very well. My first film and television television audition was with her. So I know that she was, you know, really pushing for her, her local people. But when I saw the caliber of the show, producers of the crown, Amazon Left Bank, I was like, Oh, wow, thanks, Andrea. But, you know, I'll give it my best shot but I think And they'll bring in a name or you know, I don't know, I just thought it was it was something that I was really happy to show what I could do but had no expectations whatsoever. So I really did the audition for myself and for Andrea, who was the casting director, because I knew she would just get a kick out of this crazy character that I put together. And I guess she did because a month later they called and they said, we loved your tape. It was way too big. Bring it down. I kind of did a 180 on the character. Well, not on the character. But you know, on the comedic, I really grounded her. And they they wanted to meet and they said, let's, let's find a middle ground between your two tapes. We did. And then I found out I got the role. But it was such a whirlwind. I really didn't think in that initial audition. I even had a shot, which definitely worked in my favor. Because if I did think I hadn't shot, I don't think I would have been as adventurous as I could have been.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, that's that's a huge insight. What really stands out to me is that you had totally bought into this isn't for me. So therefore you kind of take an element of risk away. But then what I heard, right, because what do you got to lose? Because you've in your head, you've already lost? I mean, it's not. It's not mine. That's what it sounds like what motivated you what made it really real was your heart center, you would I heard you say loud and clear, I did it for her. I wanted to show her what I could do talk to me about that. That's interesting.

Sarah Booth:

We have a very special relationship. Andrea has always pushed for me, Andrea and also her partner, Randy, who they both believe in me so much. And have really brought me in for the biggest projects that have come to Montreal, or that are you know, that they're casting close to Montreal. And I was just I think there was a playfulness to receiving this audition. I hadn't seen Andrea in a long time it was during the pandemic. So I knew I probably wouldn't see her for a very long time. And I felt very comfortable with her whenever I went to audition at her office. So I felt like I just wanted to send her like a fun message, I guess. So like, they like what a fine character. Here's my spin, you know, and it just felt fun to do. Honestly, my, I had to change my perspective on auditions, like in the past two to three years. I just, it wasn't a job opportunity anymore. It was just fun. It was playtime. That's it I had to take that away, I had to take the desperation away. I was in LA, I had five jobs, I just wanted to book something. So I didn't have to run around with like, a chicken with my head cut off. So I think really working on that part of myself and not expecting a job, but just having a 20 minute session with my friend in my apartment to just play around. That's when my career really changed. Wow. Yes,

Lisa Hopkins:

that's super interesting. Yeah. So again, back to the sort of feeling of you talk to me about sort of the action items and that once you process it, you know how you're going to move it into action. I'm curious to know if it's okay with you like internally what you've noticed so far, or maybe what you're just noticing right now about how you're receiving and perceiving things around you.

Sarah Booth:

I have to sit down and breathe. Because it feels a little bit like a super fun tornado. I feel like my brain is constantly going a mile a minute. Oh, someone messaged me. I want to message them back. Oh, I have to do this. I have to do that. I have interviews. It's like all like, welcomed chaos right now. Which I'm really enjoying. And you know, I definitely feel like the stress in my body. Obviously a good stress. But I feel like I don't want to miss a moment of it. It's fun. It's really fun.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Oh, it's so it's just I mean, I feel it it's emanating off of you. But I feel like even without this project you have that I don't know you but my instinct is that that's this part of that. That that was that was seen or that you you allowed to really be you in that mindset shift that you that you talked about right where you put fun back in it which is obviously huge part of you. I mean when I'm looking at your You know your bio and stuff and that you know the she used to save the day, right? I mean live stunt show right and challenging your adventurous spirit. Talk to me a little bit about your adventurous spirit. And when you noticed it showing up in your life.

Sarah Booth:

I grew up in a small town of 2000 people, some very farm dairy farms. My backyard was probably three kilometers long. We have animals, I had a pony. It was just I don't think I ever realized how adventurous I was until I moved to the city and started. I love that I was in the city, of course. But I was like, Oh, I have all this, this energy. Where do where does it go? So that's when I really got into fitness because they needed like my hands, my hamster wheel in the city. So yeah, I have trouble sitting still long. I love traveling for work. I love discovering new cities. When I got the idea to move to LA. I was like, let's do it. Let's just Let's just do it. I love kind of jumping in to events sometimes. Which is, you know, pros and cons, of course. But I feel like it's really helped me and in my life in my career to just stay curious. Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. You know,

Sarah Booth:

never. I feel like if I had a job that I knew my hours every week, and when my vacation was and all that stuff. I'm sure part of me would have resented about that. But I think I would get bored of it really quickly. Makes Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

How long ago was it that you went to LA talk to me about that transition? So you went from small town farm girl, probably to high school. Did you training in Montreal? I'm guessing. Right? Yep. So which is the big city right nearest to you? And then I think you went to Toronto? Is that right in between that? Yep. That makes sense. Yeah. Talk to me from there. Like what that transition going to LA and how long you spent there. Just sort of a brief I'm curious about that. Yeah.

Sarah Booth:

I lived in Toronto for about two and a half years after I moved from Montreal. And I just couldn't, I just wasn't happy in that city. And I think part of it is because I was struggling so hard. I couldn't find an agent. I couldn't find, you know, auditions to save my life. So it was a little bit of a struggle. And I decided, You know what, my goal is to live in LA. And my husband is in the industry. He's a filmmaker, he obviously was onboard to move as well. And we had a movie come out where we said, hey, let's go to LA for two months, the movies coming out great time to, you know, meet up with some people and have a little heat. So we went down in a month into being in Los Angeles, I was like, We gotta stay. I love it here. And so we started the application for the green card. And waited, I think about nine months to get a yes or no if we could stay or not. So those nine months were stressful, can't work. Can't leave. You know, I don't know how they expect people to live, but that's what we had to do. And I when we found out we got our green cards, I was just like, I was crying. It you know, because in a way you're thinking, wow, my whole, like, at least this version of my dream is weighing on this. That's stressful. You know? So once we got the Yes, it was great. We stayed for about six years, made some great connections, some great friends, we found our la people, which was great, because I had spoken to a lot of people saying, oh, you know, I don't like LA I don't like people bla bla bla. And, I mean, we definitely found a great group of friends. And I could see how some people would like LA you know, depending where you live and all that stuff. But if you live with, with all the artists, you know, you find some good people the real artist.

Lisa Hopkins:

Absolutely. So how long have you been back or what what brought you back to Canada.

Sarah Booth:

The pandemic brought us back once the pandemic hit. No work in Los Angeles. Everything. Fitness, Waterworld, acting, everything was shut down. And my grandmother was was ill. So I decided to come home and take care of her for about three and a half months. And as soon as I landed, I was like, we have to come home. I just like had this feeling that we had to come home. So after three and a half months, I flew back to Los Angeles. We packed up a U haul and drove home. Wow. Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

What point in that did you audition for three pints?

Sarah Booth:

I auditioned for that. I would say we moved back in November and I auditioned for three pints for the first time I think in

Lisa Hopkins:

June. Oh interesting. So we'd have enough for you after you came home.

Sarah Booth:

Yeah happened after we came home. It honestly as soon as we moved to Canada it It has been nonstop. It's been so busy, which is fantastic. I think they had to also hire a lot more Canadians for the projects that we're shooting up here during the pandemic. So, so many amazing Canadian actors got some really awesome roles and opportunities, which is fantastic. Yeah. And it's so busy, busy, busy, busy here.

Lisa Hopkins:

Great. That's so good. I'm so happy to hear that. It's interesting, actually, in three pints Gamal says something about I'm paraphrasing, but he says something about the biggest mistake you can make is is taking actions on assumptions. Yeah, something to that effect. Totally. What do you think about that statement? for yourself?

Sarah Booth:

Oh, I think that's a great statement. I definitely, like I said, didn't think I would book this role. Especially in this career. I mean, in any career in life, we assume so much. And, you know, I feel like, the older we get, the more situations we've been in, we realize that there aren't really any rules. So don't assume ask, especially being a part of, you know, this project that I just did, where it was my first series regular role, where I felt like I had more control where I was able to have say about my character a little bit more. It gave me this, like, confidence, this different kind of confidence, where I felt like, well, you know, instead of saying like, Oh, well, if I asked that, like, maybe, you know, maybe they'll say no, or whatever. And now I just have more confidence to be like, Hey, can I have access to that? Or? Or can we do you know, like, just to speak up a little bit more, which feels really nice. Gives you a little more control, or at least makes you feel like you have more control? Do we have any? I don't know.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. No, that's it's really interesting. I mean, in the work I do, I talk about, you know, shifting energy, meaning literally, you know, if you have like a certain amount of energy that you're spending towards something, right, if you can repurpose it, which you did with your assumptions right now, because now that now that you're in it, something shifted, right. So now you have more room, less room for assumptions, but more room for this confidence that you're talking about, or for this new, right, more positive anabolic energy, which is pretty cool.

Sarah Booth:

Yeah, yeah, it feels it feels great. Just to know that, especially as actors, we're always so used to, not having control, just being kind of, I hate this word, but being kind of desperate, willing to like, just like, sit there and shut up because you want this job. So it's just nice to, you know, have room to have a little bit more space.

Lisa Hopkins:

To do what you do best. Yeah. Right. Isn't it ironic that actors who are so you know, brilliantly, you know, gifted at doing what they do? Sometimes we only get the tip of the iceberg? Because they don't feel the permission to do it. Right. So,

Sarah Booth:

absolutely. And permission, I think is, well, it's huge for me, that's one thing I've noticed, if someone gives me any permission in life, I will go 110% Or if they say I can't do it. So

Lisa Hopkins:

I love that talk to me about that. So when someone says to you, you can't What do you rise? Oh,

Sarah Booth:

I like I just competitive competitive not competing with anybody else, I guess. But just competing with myself, like, Oh, you don't think I can do that? Oh, I can do that. It's just pushed me to like so many levels. And my husband really knows I have that button. And he uses it sometimes during the pandemic, because I'm self taping all the time from home. I can zoom with friends as readers, which I do many, many times. But it's nice to have a, you know, a human in the room with you reading with you. So he will and he's a director, so they would always have so he'll read with me. And sometimes, you know, if I'm not getting the scene, or I find a challenge in the scene, be like, I don't know if I can do this. I don't think this is me and like he'll find some way to challenge me. And I'm like, Okay, let's go. Yeah,

Lisa Hopkins:

I love it. Yeah, it's a great motivator sometimes. Right? It is.

Sarah Booth:

Yeah, it really is. As long as it's not always. It's good.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, no, that makes it makes perfect sense. So what is your definition of living in the moment?

Sarah Booth:

My definition is just among the chaos, being able to recognize that you're in a tornado. But being able to take a breath and enjoy that no matter what tornado you're in, I think is It's important because I think like the momentum sometimes of either tragedy or excitement, you like you're on the ride, right? It's just like, you're gone. But I feel like good moments, bad moments to be able to just, like, slow down that momentum and say like, okay, like, you know, my grandmother passed away a few years ago. But I was able to be in the room right after she passed with my family and be like, This is a beautiful moment. This is really nice. It's shitty, but this is actually a really nice moment for everyone. So I think you know what I mean? Like just being able to like, halt for a second

Lisa Hopkins:

100% And it sounds like pull backs zoom out as well,

Sarah Booth:

right? Yeah. Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, that's really beautiful. I love Oh, speaking of assumptions, what do most people assume about you that they get wrong? Do you think

Sarah Booth:

that I'm not nice?

Lisa Hopkins:

They assume that you're not nice.

Sarah Booth:

When they let me they don't know me at all. Okay. So many people meet me in real life. And they're like, Oh, my God. You're so nice. And I'm like, Okay, I guess because of a lot of people have seen me play really dramatic stuff. Or, you know, that's mostly what they see of me. They assume I'm like this, like, dandy badass, like, I'm gonna punch you in. No, but yeah, so many people, Gavin's friends because Gavin will post sorry, Gavin is my husband. He will post you know, all he's, he's very proud has been he's often like that. And I'll meet his friends, especially now that we live in Windsor, his hometown of neatest friends. And they're always like, she still? Has they only see me through Facebook or whatever.

Lisa Hopkins:

That's funny. Yeah. Interesting. How does that make you feel? Like when? Are you surprised? Like,

Sarah Booth:

yeah, I was surprised at first, but now it just makes me feel like I'm doing a great job.

Lisa Hopkins:

I love it. That's awesome. What's the one? What would you say is one big audacious goal, that or dream that you have that that you haven't really even put out in the universe yet. There's something you'd like to share.

Sarah Booth:

I want to travel more. Travel for pleasure. Wouldn't be nice, more. I travel for work, which is great. Love it. But I want to feed the adventurous soul. I haven't surfed for quite a few years, I stopped when I moved to Los Angeles. I had Costa Rica on my bucket list. I have Australia on my bucket list. So many places. So I would like to set up my life in a way that I work. And then I have some time off that I can be like, see later. For

Lisa Hopkins:

you. Yeah, put all your energy into that adventure. Yeah, yeah, that's brilliant. I mean, it's interesting, because it does sound like you're living a beautiful kind of balance. I mean, you're getting lots of adventure in your work, which is really, really cool that I'm hearing you say that. I really want to devote some time to my first love of adventure.

Sarah Booth:

I do. Yeah. I just want to go. You know, ride horses in the Rockies. Why not?

Lisa Hopkins:

Well, yeah. 100% Oh, my gosh.

Sarah Booth:

There's too many beautiful things to see. Like, I am starting to get FOMO

Lisa Hopkins:

is that right? Yeah. That's interesting. What's something that you've seen recently that you kind of go Dang, I want to do that. But I don't have time.

Sarah Booth:

Iceland? Huh? Yeah, they have. They put out a special flights out of Detroit for like, I think $500 return. And I was like, That would be fun. And everyone says if you're an outdoorsy person, Iceland is just totally, yeah, super cool.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Is there something like what's one thing that you don't want people to know about you that, you know? Yeah, I know. That's a kind of a you don't have to answer it. If you don't want to know

Sarah Booth:

I well. I think one thing that I don't want people to know about me, which they probably do, but I think they don't is that I can be really sensitive. Yeah, I kind of have more of like a tough, you know, I'm fine. It's good. But yeah, I think that I that I can be really sensitive. And I don't want to show it like I'm definitely more emotional than I show. Which I think I get that that's why I love performing because I can live through really interesting, crazy moments without it It's just you know, it's there's no stakes in my real life. Obviously, in the work there is but yeah, yeah, it's it's fun and weird.

Lisa Hopkins:

No, it's super interesting because it's like a such a paradox. I love paradoxes because on the one hand, the way you live your life and with our conversation about adventure, right, the ultimate and risk for you sounds like would be to not have, you know, not to sort of conduit, your your sensitivity through a character, which actually really serves you because it's what you do, and you're serving others. And it's safe, because you're good at that. But I'm hearing that the vulnerability piece is really hard.

Sarah Booth:

Yeah, personally, yes. Yeah, for sure.

Lisa Hopkins:

Absolutely. And it makes perfect sense that, you

Sarah Booth:

know, therapy is a wonderful thing.

Lisa Hopkins:

Well, there's no, it's funny, because, you know, especially in this world that we live in now, like, there's the thing about vulnerability as being a badge these days, you know, like, it's, and, you know, we talk about toxic positivity, we don't talk about vulnerability to do you know, what I mean, like, there's a certain, certain sort of range of like, you know, we're all on a spectrum, in every moment, in every day in the big picture in the world, in our family in our work. And I think this, you know, and I mean, I work, you know, obviously, you know, the coach, I work with us and mindset and stuff, but it's not about attaining one mindset, just as it's not about getting one gig, right? I mean, we're playing one role, right? It's about being able to access all the parts of you. So that when you need to play a role, you can, let's say or, right,

Sarah Booth:

yeah, and do it in a healthy way too. Because I remember earlier my career Well, geez, right up to not long ago, I mean, you know, we'll have different triggers for No, you know, and they'll last a certain amount of time, and then they'll get stale, and you need a new trigger. And most, you know, for motion and things like that I used to use, like, you know, sad triggers, all those things that you can think about dog parents, grandparents, whatever. And then that stopped working for me, like a few months ago. And I was like, Oh, my losing it, you know, my moving my guest. And then all of a sudden, I realized what was what would what was useful to get me emotional, was thinking about all the things I was happy about. Just like a total 180. And I was like, oh, that's, I feels healthier. You know? Yeah. That's so interesting.

Lisa Hopkins:

It's really interesting, because the way you triggered yourself to do what you do, well, always worked until it didn't. And that's the that's your edge. That's literally your edge. And that's where you you recognize that what got you here is not going to get you where you want

Sarah Booth:

to go. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. You don't want to damage yourself, or you don't want to, you know, just start phoning it in, if you can't, because you know it. And that's like, that'll take away your confidence as a performer.

Lisa Hopkins:

Well, and there's nothing wrong with doing it the way you did it. It's just not serving you anymore. Like don't spend any energy going back going. Yeah, that wasn't okay. It worked. And it was fine. And you used it and you're here you obviously didn't kill you. Yeah, there was there was something bad about it. Right. Looking in retrospect, it's a waste of time really saying other than anything we can mine as a gift to say, how can I use that moving forward? This information? Yeah, yeah, that's beautiful. That's pretty cool. I'm excited for you. And that sort of knew it was timed well, too. Right. Synchronicity I wonder? I think so. Wow. I think so too. What do you know, we'll we'll stay true about you. Really? No matter what happens? What can no one take away from you?

Sarah Booth:

My sense of humor. I have, I love to laugh, and have fun. And I think that's just in me. Yeah. And yeah, I feel like no one could really take that away from me because I can make funny jokes in my head. I don't have to say that out loud. Yeah, yeah. I drive to hmm, yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

If you couldn't do what you do, like if you couldn't act or let's say you couldn't even be in the arts. What What would you do? Do you think?

Sarah Booth:

Before I discovered I wanted to be an actor. i My uncle was the spokesperson for a car company that sponsors a lot of equestrian events. So he did PR for them he would travel, present trophies. Whatever, you know, golf tournament or whatever he would, so he was kind of there to like, celebrate, have fun. And I was like, wow, that's such a fun job. I would love to do that. So that's what I wanted to do. I was gonna go into communications cool. And then my high school started an arts program, the last two years of high school for me, and I got cast in a play and I was like, Oh, here we go.

Lisa Hopkins:

How do you want? How do you want to be remembered?

Sarah Booth:

I want to be remembered by someone who is generous. Who likes to take care of other people. And who people remember as being really fun. Yeah, no, I'm gonna be like, the fun. You know, I don't like children. But I I love kids. I just don't want my own won't be fun. And we can come I'll be like, Yeah, I'm in LA shooting for the next three months go like that, you know, I that's, I want to have meaningful relationships with, you know, my nephews and my nieces. But, yeah, like, I don't know, I just, I guess I just want to be known as like the fun and

Lisa Hopkins:

yeah, everybody needs a fun Do you have? I meant to ask you, where do you fall in that? Do you have siblings? And I have an older brother. Got it. I was curious. Because when you're talking about growing up and being like, really adventurous and ballsy and all that kind of thing. I was like, I meant to ask you earlier like, Oh, I wonder if she was like brought up with like a lot of brothers but just wanted right.

Sarah Booth:

one older brother and his friends like I would always want to hang out with the guys always do with the guys. We're doing high school. Hung out with his friends, David. But yeah, I just I was always kind of like, yeah, just always with the dudes. I had a lot of girlfriends too, but I don't know. I didn't. I didn't like the you know, sometimes there's like cattiness, or I mean, it happens on both sides. But I was like, I was afraid to get too close to girls, I would say I would. It was easier with the dudes. Yeah,

Lisa Hopkins:

they were to fit the girls have to feel it. Right.

Sarah Booth:

Yeah, exactly. Didn't want to be feeling. Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

Understandable. Right. I love that, though.

Sarah Booth:

Then we grow up and find out well, men are actually more sensitive.

Lisa Hopkins:

They just they just don't know how to do it. They just don't know how to. How to navigate that. That's super interesting.

Sarah Booth:

But I relate. Because it's hard for me to.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, yeah. It's important to,

Sarah Booth:

to to be able to like to be vulnerable. Yeah. Yes. Because I feel like I need I need those moments to draw on in my life. I need to live life to the fullest. So I think the most important parts are when we're vulnerable. And if I feel so much better after I am, of course,

Lisa Hopkins:

most interesting, what, what does it look like to vulnerability? Like, how do you define it? Because I think it's defined differently for everybody, right?

Sarah Booth:

I think being vulnerables being too scared to say something but saying it anyways. I guess talking your truth, even though it's terrifying. That will be vulnerability to me. Whether it's sad, happy, scary, like being able to just tell someone something truthful, that you want to tell them? Pretty, pretty powerful. Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Thank you, first of all, for sharing that. What's the fear? Like what's the perceived fear? You know, and I understand that I hear you. I, you know, and it's interesting. You said in saying it anyways, what's what's the fear? Like? What is the worst case scenario? Do you know what I mean?

Sarah Booth:

I think it could. Sometimes it could be come from somewhere that you're not sure. Complete or you don't completely understand your feelings. So that can be confusing. And maybe unclear to the other person or your feelings might change. So you feel like oh, maybe I shouldn't mention it now. Because I'm not 100% Sure, like where I'm going with this. or fear of rejection, fear of being shamed. Judgment, basically,

Lisa Hopkins:

I would say, so let's do the rapid fire. Okay, so I'm gonna say what makes you and you say whatever comes to your mind. Okay, great. Well, Get. So what inspires you?

Sarah Booth:

anything around me?

Lisa Hopkins:

Love it? What makes you sad?

Sarah Booth:

lonely old people? Hmm. I could I could cry just thinking that right now.

Lisa Hopkins:

That's interesting. I mean, why?

Sarah Booth:

When I see them in public, maybe I make up a story but I met like when someone's like old and struggling and alone, I'm just like, like imagine having no one. No one left to be with or take care of you.

Lisa Hopkins:

Sounds like that's a good tool for

Sarah Booth:

you. Right? Thank you. We just discovered another one for the old toolbox that was especially old men. Hmm. Because I feel like old women can take care of themselves. But old men out there, there's something about it. Huh?

Lisa Hopkins:

What what frustrates you?

Sarah Booth:

Oh, I just got like, full of something what frustrates me like running out of patience. That first like when when like, you're just like waiting for something to happen, and it won't happen. That frustrates me.

Lisa Hopkins:

Interesting. So you mean running out of patience? Or do you mean just having to be patient?

Sarah Booth:

Okay, I guess having to be patient? I guess the frustration comes when I've run out.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, it's an important distinction. Right? Would you consider yourself a patient person?

Sarah Booth:

No. Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

Is that because you haven't had to be and things have worked well, with your rhythm? Or?

Sarah Booth:

I think so. Yeah. I've like honestly, I don't have very many complaints in life. And I think the things that I do get frustrated with are not like, let's be honest, it's not anything that you know, is life changing. Well, I mean, you know, life changing meds but yeah, it's just I find it hard to get something out of my head when it's in my head. Yeah, I get obsessive a little bit

Lisa Hopkins:

was really interesting. Because your your body changed completely when you went, Oh, I just something came up on me. What was what was your brain? Where did it go? Did it did it actually take you to it's something that you can share? That is is a recent frustration? Or was it just purely visceral? Because it seemed so like, present?

Sarah Booth:

I think it was just visceral. Yeah. Because I can't think of a specific interesting, you know, but Oh, yeah. I don't know why when I know something's coming like anticipation. It like have really frustrates me.

Lisa Hopkins:

How do you do? Are you good with anticipation? Like, are you like, Are you better with this motion?

Sarah Booth:

I'm better with motion if I'm feeling anxious or something like that. I run. Just put on my headphones in my running shoes. And I run run run.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. What makes you what makes you hungry?

Sarah Booth:

Like, physically hungry? Or like, like, hungry?

Lisa Hopkins:

Whatever you like. What came to mind first?

Sarah Booth:

Fit. What makes me hungry is the smell of fresh bread. I cannot resist. That's it.

Lisa Hopkins:

And if it were to be if it were to be something more esoteric or altruistic, what would it be? And it doesn't maybe there isn't anything right now. That's fine.

Sarah Booth:

Well, right now, I could say that. What makes me hungry is a challenge, huh?

Lisa Hopkins:

No, totally cool. What makes you angry?

Sarah Booth:

People that are mean for no reason. Or, I mean, any reason like there's no reason to be mean, but you know, what, if someone's just having a bad day, and they just like want to make someone else have a bad day. I hate that. So people that are mean to service people I was a waitress for ever. And I'm people that serve clients like customer service, any kinds of those jobs. I've so much respect for and people who are rude to these people. I can't deal with that. I can't.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, fair enough. Finally, what makes me grateful.

Sarah Booth:

My family, my dog. And I'm really grateful that I have really a really strong support system. Family Friends. I'm really really lucky with that. That's pretty cool. I think yeah, having just having everyone be Want to be along for the ride is really fun. I brought my mom to the premiere, and she had so much fun. And I love seeing that. That was that was more fun to watch than the show.

Lisa Hopkins:

That's cool. All the residual Joy right from the thing. Love it big joy.

Sarah Booth:

Yeah. Feel very open right now which make healing.

Lisa Hopkins:

Oh, well. I mean, yeah, my pleasure just to hold space. I mean, I just I feel that artists in particular, rarely get that because they're so busy giving, or so busy perceiving what his needs needed to be given or, you know, showing up in a certain way and all of that. And it's a huge joy to me just to offer that to artists. It's

Sarah Booth:

such, it's also so nice and refreshing. You have amazing questions. And like it makes you reflect. And I'll be thinking about these questions. Like, you know, for quite a few days seemed like, you know, you just kind of replay it in your head. And it's it's, I don't know, I just love talking and discovering more things about myself and other people.

Lisa Hopkins:

I love that. Does it make you is it more fun or more vulnerable for you?

Sarah Booth:

Oh, I would say vulnerable. Oh, cool. Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

So you had fun being vulnerable a little bit though?

Sarah Booth:

I did. Yes. Yeah, I just I just need someone to be like, push me push me out of the playing. Yeah, I feel like once that, once I open up I feel like it flows but it's just like that initial.

Lisa Hopkins:

It's beautiful. You have a beautiful energy. Oh, thank you. Very beautiful. What are the top three things that have happened so far today?

Sarah Booth:

I got to hang out with my mother in law. Nice. I had an amazing ride on my peloton. And my dog got the cutest haircut

Lisa Hopkins:

really short or?

Sarah Booth:

Yeah, it's a little short, but he needs a dog to have. He's a Yorkie mix with Pomeranian he looks like oh my gosh. He's very cute.

Lisa Hopkins:

And so finally, what are you most looking forward to?

Sarah Booth:

I'm most looking forward to me. I am most looking forward to that's a really hard one. I think just getting back to work. Yeah. Seeing what's next? Yeah. Yeah. Um, yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. He'll give us our oh my gosh, I can't thank you enough for spending this time with me again. I know you're really busy. And it's been such a joy speaking with you truly.

Sarah Booth:

Thank you so much. It's been a joy for me.

Lisa Hopkins:

It's my pleasure. I've been speaking today with Sarah booth. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and healthy everyone and remember to live in the moment. In music, stop time is that beautiful moment where the band is suspended and rhythmic Unison supporting the soloist to express their individuality. In the moment, I encourage you to take that time and create your own rhythm. Until next time, I'm Lisa Hopkins. Thanks for listening