STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.

Lorin Latarro: Infinite Beginnings

August 31, 2021 Lisa Hopkins, Wide Open Stages Season 4 Episode 13
STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.
Lorin Latarro: Infinite Beginnings
Show Notes Transcript

I caught up with Lorin Latarro  after a rehearsal for Waitress, which is getting ready to reopen after being dark for almost 18 months. It's one of the first shows to be back since Broadway shut down in March 2020 and starts in previews on September 2.  Lorin is no stranger to the Broadway stage as a dancer, she has appeared on Broadway in 14 shows  and in addition to Waitress,  is choreographer for Mrs. Doubtfire which returns to Broadway in October,  Almost Famous the Public's  The Visitor and the Broadway bound musicals The Outsiders and Like Water for Chocolate

We chat about lessons learned during a pandemic, the joy of motherhood, creating work-life balance  and the true definition of being an artist.

"I walked into this business wanting it badly, and at the same time wanting a full life. "

"Turning the faucet off was very difficult for me, but then it was comfortable."

"I am an artist because I'm an artist. I am not an artist. Because I'm working in the industry. What I learned is that I bring my artistry to my daily life."

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Lisa Hopkins:

This is the stop time podcast. I'm your host, Lisa Hopkins, and I'm here to engage you in thought provoking motivational conversations around practicing the art of living in the moment. I'm a certified life coach, and I'm excited to dig deep and offer insights into embracing who we are and where we are at. My next guest is no stranger to the Broadway stage. As a dancer, she has appeared in Broadway and 14 shows including Fossey moving out a chorus line spam, a lot and swing. She choreographed Broadway in London's waitress and La Traviata at the Met opera. She's currently choreographing Broadway is Mrs. Doubtfire, Almost Famous the Publix the visitor and Broadway Bound The Outsiders and like water for chocolate. She is a Drama Desk lortel and Chita Rivera nominee and has traveled to India and Africa multiple times to work with the Gates Foundation in family health and planning. I caught up with her after a rehearsal for waitress, which is getting ready to reopen after being dark for almost 18 months. It's one of the first shows to be back on Broadway and starts in previews on September 2. I think you're gonna love this conversation with Lorin Latarro, Lorin welcome.

Lorin Latarro:

Thank you.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, I know, you're just rushing in and when I invited you to join me, you shared with me my schedule was right. And so you said Oh, yeah. I, I've rehearsals ten to six, Monday through Saturday. And, you know, I'm going into tech. But the fact that you, you know, we're still willing, I was ready for the next line to be so thanks. But I have no time. But it was like, but yeah. Like literally and not only Yeah, but willing to find the time. So that says a lot about you. It really, really does. And it made me even more excited to get to know you a little bit. So first question, really? I'm curious, what was it? We don't know each other? You're a very busy lady. What was it about me asking you that made you decide? Yeah!

Lorin Latarro:

I just think it's an interesting time. And I think people need connections, including me. So talking to somebody seemed like a fun idea. I mean, it's been an isolated year and a half and not much talk about my art and our our art and our industry and our community. So I thought it would be fun to just, you know, get into it and have a conversation.

Lisa Hopkins:

So the saying yes, thing kind of stood out to me. And so I just want to dig in there a little bit. Because, I mean, if you look at what you've done, doesn't look like you said a whole, a lot of nos.

Lorin Latarro:

Generally, in my life, say yes. You know, I probably could learn how to say no, a little more often, but I don't really, I don't know, I have a lot of energy. And I'm not a big sleeper. And I'm not an introvert. So I don't know. Unless it doesn't seem like a good idea. I generally am willing to try something.

Lisa Hopkins:

Why do you think that is? Like it doesn't sound to me like that was a message that was sent to you like it is so many of us in the performing arts? Like just say yes, just say yes, you have to say so a lot of a lot of people I speak with and that I've worked with have said yes. Because they felt like they should they had a limiting belief of should it became this fear based yes.

Lorin Latarro:

That's not me, I think that first of all, I have seen the sound so corny, but I've seen the power of Yes. In other words, I just always was enthusiastic, maybe sometimes overly enthusiastic. If I had, if I had to lean one way, I'm probably the person that's a little too enthusiastic about things. But it always, it always worked for me. In other words, when I said yes, and offered myself something, it didn't always pan out. But I generally learned something from it, even if what I learned is I don't want to be in that room anymore. Or I don't want to give that much of myself to somebody anymore. I've always sort of, for better or for worse, need or use the experience to then make those decisions. But I would say overall, that being in a room and saying yes to something an experience of any sort has been overwhelmingly positive versus negative for me.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, and you don't strike me as someone another thing that stood out and again, I don't know you but one of my favorite things to do when I don't know the guest is to really kind of to research them and to look and when I'm researching I'm not looking at your choreography I'm looking at maybe things you said or snippets of something, you know, like I like to hear and and it strikes me that that's kind of your superpower. I mean, some people again, say yes, and just trust the process and jump in which I'm hearing a little bit of that but with you I feel like you have a superpower of confidence and that is backed up with everything's gonna just happen the way it's going to happen but, but you always show up as prepared. as you can and and that you're aligned with yourself, that's what that's what I get from you.

Lorin Latarro:

Yeah, I think for sure, I think that's how I've survived in this industry is that I've tried to make the industry work for me. And what is aligned about that is that I love what I do. So it's not that hard to make it work for me, because in general experiences creatively make me happy. But when I'm not happy, I also very easily leave that space.

Lisa Hopkins:

Fair enough. And so when when you're not happy, and you're aware that you're not happy in a situation, what do you do?

Lorin Latarro:

I mean, I change jobs. Or I speak up, you know,

Lisa Hopkins:

yeah. I love that. I love that. So, so if I'm hearing you correctly, you you leap into not just anything, you leap into something that you feel obviously aligned with, you know, your do do due diligence, and that you feel you can offer to and also that it can offer you something because it sounds like growth is huge, right? You're not just going to take every single show for a gig, right?

Lorin Latarro:

I'm always interested in learning and learning learning. Oh, at the eternal student is my motto.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. I mean, that's, that's the mastery mindset isn't is really the infinite mind. I mean, it's that sort of, you know, not just going from goal to goal and getting to the goal and not finding what you thought you'd feel when you got there, but rather going in knowing what, what your values are, what what you're standing in, and then not taking it personally when things don't work, because it's not you.

Lorin Latarro:

Right.

Lisa Hopkins:

So is there been a time like when maybe you wish you had said no? Or what it would have served

Lorin Latarro:

I mean when I'm working 8am to midnight for five weeks in a row? And I'm like, who thought this was a good idea? I mean, yes, but the great thing about this industry is that every job has an opening night, and like there's just this thing that you're headed towards, and then it's done. Yeah, creatively in the way that you are asked to be present. Anyway. So it's alright. So even if I'm over over extended, or doing something I'm not happy with there's, there's an end date, so let's just do what we can. And then, and then you get to sort of start over, you know, doing shows affords a person infinite beginnings.

Lisa Hopkins:

Absolutely.That's a beautiful way to look at it. And it's, it's somewhat like, I mean, you're a mom. So it's not unlike giving birth is it each time.

Lorin Latarro:

It's the same and it's also just like being with a child every day. It's like, every day is different and some days, stink some minutes stink it's more like, sometimes I can be with my daughter for like, a 10 minute span. Like, you know, one minute is amazing. The next minute is horrible. The next minute, sort of, Okay, the next minute foods all over the place. Like so many things happen. So just just riding the wave.

Lisa Hopkins:

She's three, right? You said?

Lorin Latarro:

And she's three, it's just three and a half. Yeah, no, the business is a lot like this, like she heard herself the other day. And she was, you know, you know, pain is, you know, think about what it feels like, I know it hurts, but it's just a feeling it will go away, which is one feeling. It's not like the end of the world.

Lisa Hopkins:

Pain is inevitable suffering is optional, right. What do you think about grit? You know, I've been reading a lot about grit. I don't know if you're into that sort of kind of reading, but and the idea that, you know, this whole myth that, you know, yeah, gotta have the grit. You got to do this, you know, I'm picturing No, Debbie Allen, as I said that, you know, well, fame costs, you know, that's sort of Yeah,

Lorin Latarro:

It's a big conversation these days. And I think it's different for everybody. And I was talking to my friend who was a dancer for many years and went back to school for psychology. And everybody has a different relationship to pain to joy to trauma to, you know, old wounds to new ones. So it's different and it's just a managing, I think this field, you know, all of it. And I think that I had a young actress today in rehearsal. So first Broadway show, she was non equity a week ago, and she just got waitress And this is her first equity job and first job on Broadway. And ironically, I gave her her first job eight years ago and non equity at Barrington stage doing "Kiss Me Kate" So she knew me eight years ago. So she came up to me during lunch break today. And she said, What? You know, you've been in this business a long time, she said something nice about me. And then she said, What, what? Tell me what do you think it is about this business? What what are the pitfalls and what should I do? And I just said, you know, you have to take care of yourself. And you have to check in with yourself every couple of months, and just make sure that you're still aligned with your desires. You can't let this business take over you, you have to make it work for your life, you have to have a full life and this business has to be a part of that life. And then at certain points in your life, the business can be your whole life. But wouldn't it be sad if the business was your whole life your whole life? You know, when I said this, it's like, there is a time, right? It's like Ecclesiastes, there is a time and that time can fluctuate, just like a three year olds time fluctuates within 10minutes of joy and pain and scared and all those things. So it's like just being present. Otherwise, I think that too much grit and not enough consciousness. Just, you know, boy, that carrot is always inches away from your fingertips. So if you chase the carrot your whole life, what kind of life is that, but if you, you know, make sure the carrot is in your eyesight and still do other things. And every once in a while, turn your back on the carrot. I think that I think there's something there. I mean, there's a difference between performing through, you know, a little pain and performing on a broken leg. But pain feels different for everybody. And that can go for emotional or physical. So it's very, you know, it's like, we're just beginning this conscious kind of conversation about things.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yes, indeed. It sounds like that's, that's a philosophy that you've had. I mean, it feels like you've had it forever. It doesn't feel like you had an epiphany one day.

Lorin Latarro:

No, it might have been my you know, I don't know, immigrant parents, but I walked into this. I walked into this business wanting it badly, and at the same time wanting a full life. Hmm. You know, making sure that, you know, I mean, even the act of having a child in this industry, it took immense courage, and I hid it from everybody until I was I was eight months pregnant, and a producer was like, um, are you pregnant? Yeah. And some of that has to do with just being an industry that is freelance, essentially, you don't there's no, you know, there's no maternity leave. There's no like, I've been in this company for 20 years since this doesn't exist.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, no, absolutely.That makes perfect sense. I'm curious, though. You I know your parents were not in the arts and that you just somehow were born with wanting to dance. Right? I learned that about you.

Lorin Latarro:

Totally, like first grade. I was like, I want to be a dancer. And I'm not I'm still not sure. Like, maybe all little girls used to say that. And I just never outgrew it. I don't know. I remember being in like, sixth grade, we went to see the Nutcracker. And I pointed Juilliard. And I was like, What is that building? And some like, that's like fame. But for college, like you go there if you want a dancer singer act, and I was like, that's what I'm gonna go. Decided.

Lisa Hopkins:

That's so interesting. So what's your Achilles heel? I mean, you obviously are a very strong, talented, creative person. But what's your Achilles heel?

Lorin Latarro:

I mean, I probably will die of like, you know, like, Alzheimer's, because I get no sleep. So I don't know. I mean, you know, I mean, I, I've tons of Achilles heels, you know, I mean, tons.

Lisa Hopkins:

You wanna share one?

Lorin Latarro:

Sure. I mean, um, I mean, sometimes they care too much about things that I don't need to care about. And I want to be successful to the point that I think I want to be liked. I think that's a biggie actually want to be liked. So, you know, you have to decide about telling the truth. You know, we're being liked. I think that's always I think that, you know, definitely that's the thing, right? It's like, do i want to be likable in this moment, or do you want to tell my truth in this moment? Mm hmm. Right. That is a biggie. I'm getting older, it's interesting to sort of see in things shift and what that feels like and sit with the uncomfortableness of some of that. And, you know,

Lisa Hopkins:

Are there sort of limiting beliefs that served you once that don't serve you anymore? When you revisit them? Do you know what I mean? Like, they're probably things as you were coming up in your career growing up, like what is shifted for you, as you've sort of become more and more ensconced in your work and your life?

Lorin Latarro:

I mean, for me, it's really about making choices that are not just about my well being bit about my family's well being. So a big shift, and sometimes it's a struggle because again, being so you know, ingrained in a certain way of thinking. I mean, that's the biggie. For me, is just like, changing my, you know, desires to fit the needs of my husband and my child and not just what I selfishly want and need is sort of the big, big shift in my life. And in saying no to a show that I've always wanted to do. You know, that might mean no I can't go out of town for eight weeks this summer with this show just doesn't work for my family.

Lisa Hopkins:

How would you say any limiting beliefs about what women can and cannot do factored into your choices along the way?

Lorin Latarro:

I was always a little bit cantankerous in this in the way that, you know, women should either have a child or work. It's unfair to a child to be a working mom. And I was like, yeah, even in like second grade, I was like, no way. You know, I was always sort of a bit of a rebel. So I would say that the limiting stuff was never something I was interested in. If something was taboo. I mean, you know, I went to Egypt by myself and college. And it was like, if it was not supposed to happen, I was doing it. It would be the other direction of like, how much is too much, is really the stuff that I'm still working on. You know, that's that. That's the step where my work is and currently is like, it's not, it doesn't mean that it's easy to say no to a job that I want that to go out of town eight weeks, but my family, you know, needs me that's not easy for me yet.

Lisa Hopkins:

No. And it's interesting, because, and I hear this a lot with the people I work with. It's interesting sometimes, too, because it can shift into the I get to say no, not I have to say no. Do you know me? Like it's a transition? Isn't it to sort of go well, what do you mean, I have to make a decision like this, I want both right. And you strike me as someone say it can be done. But to connect it like not only just in your action, but in your intention, let's say where it is really connected to your value of home, and it doesn't mean you can't have the other but maybe just not in this way or redefine?

Lorin Latarro:

Absolutely.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah, super cool. I love that. It'll be interesting to see, you're gonna raise a very fierce daughter, no doubt. So, so much obviously has shifted right, in our world and in our industry, especially over the past, what 16 months? And what discoveries have you made sort of about yourself along the way that you might not have otherwise discovered ?

Lorin Latarro:

All kinds of things! I don't know, I'm more of a homebody than I thought. And, you know, once the initial honestly, it's like we all had what psychologists call it, like a adjustment disorder, like the whole world suffered from adjustment disorder, and we're all still I'm dealing with it. Now being back at work, everybody sort of spontaneously burst out in tears, every once in a while they're like, I'm not even sure why. Yeah, it's just the you know, just just turn the faucet back on, it's very, very difficult. Turning the faucet off was very difficult for me, but then it was comfortable. And, you know, I just sort of figured out how to be a mom. And that was a big deal for me, because I went back to work two and a half weeks after I gave birth. So I literally was holding my daughter, like, why I gotta do this all day long? You know, this is like, you know, because we kept our nanny who we loved very much. We kept her on salary, it was the right thing to do. But we kept her home because it was the right thing to do. She's back with us now that I'm back to work, but I was like, full time. mommying. And I'd never done that. So that was scary. And I had to come face to face with things that I wasn't good at, and learn how to have patience with this little child, which was a really big thing for me. But I learned that he liked being home. And that I learned that as an artist. Here's what I here's, here's something huge that I think everybody probably feels but maybe hasn't put into words. I am an artist because I'm an artist. I am not an artist. Because I'm working in the industry. What I learned is that I bring my artistry to my daily life. I make my bed, like an artist. I cook like an artist. I think like an artist I pick with books I read as an artist, I watch TV and documentaries as an artist. It's I am. It's not because I'm getting paid to be. And now, sadly, was kind of regulatory for me. Because it was all tied up from me in like succeeding as an artist, you know? Yeah. Be good artists. But what does that mean? you know.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Oh, yeah. 100 Yeah, you nailed it. I mean, 100% what do you think will be different for you with that knowledge moving forward into into continuing on?

Lorin Latarro:

I'm really that consciousness about it all I'm really taking this time to really try and hold on to this sense of self that is that loves this being creative, but that is not defined by it. And that doesn't mean I'll do less or more work. It just means all approach the work in in maybe in a deeper way. Right? Because it's not about success. It's really about making sure every minute I'm I'm I want to be where I want to be, you know?

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Well, it's really it really comes down to the essence of who we are right. So that the the art That the way we do our art as artists is just a vehicle for the for coming out of us, right? You know, someone said you Lorin I'm afraid you can't choreograph for dance anymore, because that's not allowed in the world anymore. But you would be fine.

Lorin Latarro:

'd be fine. I ean, I think I'd miss it. Of ourse, right would be fine. Two ears ago, he said that to me, I on't know if I would be fine, ut I would be fine. Now in the ense that I've discovered that y creativity, I think would ove into other things.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. 100%. Do You Do you remember? You probably do like where you were on March 12. or whenever? Maybe when you heard about it?

Lorin Latarro:

Yeah. We had just had two previews for Mrs. Doubtfire. My husband is a surgeon. He's a physician. So he's at Mount Sinai. So you know, we were all week, he was like, Oh, it's not going to shut down, oh, it might shut down. This would be a precedent I can't imagine. And then like, the day it'll happen, he was like, called me He's like, something big is about to happen. I think that the hospitals are getting to a point with they're overwhelmed. And I think they might do something about it. And then by four o'clock, we were in rehearsal, and our producer came and it was their opening night for another show, which was so sad. So he was all dressed up ready for their opening night of six. We were at Mrs. Doubtfire. And he just said, cromoz closing the city for four weeks. We'll see you in four weeks, go home, rest, be safe, wash your hands. And then we went to his office, the creative team, and sat there and made the list of the what we're going to do four weeks from now. And I'm like, you know, again, it's like talking about adjustment disorder. I'm sitting there going like, well, I could get some dancers in a room tomorrow. They'll come look, come work with me. You know, can you just you don't know. And everyone's like, Yeah, great. Let's do that. You know, I mean, it's like, you just thought thinking, right, I left my sneakers on the table and my pencil and notes on the table. And, you know, I'll see them again. Like in the middle of October, we go back into rehearsals for Mrs. Doubtfire, but they've been just sitting there. Like a ghost town in the theater. It's insane. You know, four weeks became a month a month became two months, two months became four months. You know?

Lisa Hopkins:

Yep. Yeah,

Lorin Latarro:

I mean, so much wrong. You know, I mean, I thought that last September, everything was going to open back up a year ago, you know, that's a great thing. So, like, everybody, it's so funny. It's like, I'll get on a call with a, you know, somebody younger, somebody my age, somebody's very older than me. It's like an everybody feels like they're the worst age for this to have happen. Like, you know, I selfishly, of course, was like, this was the worst. Like, I was about to have three Broadway shows, I've been working my whole career for this moment, this was the season, and then just it and now everything's changed. And it's just over, it's over. It's terrible for me. And then like, you talk to these young kids who were like, I was about to have my freshman year of college and the whole thing, I missed a whole year of a college experience, or, you know, or on a lease, like I was just starting my professional career in this huge way. And it's just I lost a whole two years of my professional career, where you talk to, you know, I, you know, directors who are older and you know, in their 80s who are ready to hire and they're like, I have like one or two shows left before I die. This is the worst thing that could have ever happened. So it's just, it just hits everybody. It just hit everybody no matter what a I guess the lesson is like, it just hit everybody terribly. No matter what age it is nine year olds missing school, and homeschooling - all of us!

Lisa Hopkins:

100% What's your definition of living in the moment?

Lorin Latarro:

I'm terrible at living in the moment. But I really, really am. I, for me, I'm the most living in the moment when I'm actually in the middle of creation. Maybe that's why I find it so satisfying is that all the noise is gone. But other than that, I'm a big planner. So if I have free time, I'm planning a vacation I'm setting where we're going to go for dinner. Like great, but living in the moment for me when I am in a room inside a story that I have to create characters around and a story around I'm really in in that moment trying to make something happen and I love that I find it very satisfying. And and peaceful.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, no, absolutely. So So you've definitely felt your definition. And it's funny because your first response I just noted was like I'm not very good at it. And that right there. It's interesting is a limiting belief that a you should be good at it. It must be good for me. I don't do it. I should do it more. And it's amazing in this World of Wellness that we all Think that and then you went on to say Actually, I'm in the moment quite a lot in my work

Lorin Latarro:

Yeah, and with my baby. I will say that like, oh my gosh. For me, motherhood has been mostly glorious. I mean, like, so when I'm like, with her looking at her reading her book, in the middle of the night, you know, when she wakes up and wants me to come into her bedroom. I am truly in the moment. I mean, in fact, I'm actually I actually there are moments where I'm like, just smelling her and just saying, like, just remember this feeling because you'll you know, so those moments, I'm actually super in the moment, you know,

Lisa Hopkins:

Oh Yeah, it's so visceral. I wish people could see it, because it's like, you're almost you're bubbling and oozing with it. It's so visceral.

Lorin Latarro:

you know, what I find really interesting as an artist, before I was a mom, you'd watch all these movies or whatever it is about being a mom. And, and, and I here's how I really feel I have never seen a play a movie, a musical. A radio play. I've actually never seen this feeling truly captured. I've never seen it. It's so weird. I've seen it almost captured. I've seen like where you try and sort of pull like, try and, you know, have like a simulacra, like, you simulate the feeling, or you try and manipulate the feeling or even like, you know, even the most sort of heart wrenching shows like Lorenzo's Oil or, you know, I don't know what, you know, like Schindler's List or something Sophie's Choice. Yeah. choice. It still doesn't capture. For me anyway, what I've the gift of like, feeling what it is to be a mom, for me, this was just a huge, huge gift. I just find that interesting. That art for me hasn't didn't quite capture it.

Lisa Hopkins:

That's really interesting, because as a mother, I completely agree with you. As a mother and an artist, you never could have told me. Or you could have told me I wouldn't have believed you that being a mother is like the most incredible thing. No, I can tell you that right?

Lorin Latarro:

Yeah. And I never really seen it done well,

Lisa Hopkins:

but maybe everybody doesn't feel that way.

Lorin Latarro:

No, I don't know that they do. Mommy's working, sweetie.

Lisa Hopkins:

As if on cue. Lorin's beautiful little girl Arden came in and said hello to us. What do you know will be true about you? No matter what happens?

Lorin Latarro:

I'll be okay. I mean, I'll be alright. I love I don't know, I love experiences. So, you know. I like living and like, just think I'll find something that brings me joy. I think for the most I mean, there are certain things that you know, scare the hell out of me. But I couldn't even say out loud. But other than those things that really Yeah. You know, I think that ultimately, money where I live my business people deciding they hate me on Twitter. I think ultimately I'd be okay.

Lisa Hopkins:

Absolutely. And how do you want to be remembered?

Lorin Latarro:

Hmm, I don't know, I mean, I hope that the people I work with get something you know, that they feel is valuable. But for me at this point, who my legacy is really going to be about my family. You know, it Tony award? No Tony Award. You know, that used to be a big thing for me. I think the legacy thing has changed about what I want my legacy to be about and what I want my grandkids hopefully to, you know, tell stories about me. I mean, that's really what has shifted for me big time.

Lisa Hopkins:

Hmm. And what kind of stories do you want them to tell?

Lorin Latarro:

I don't know funny stories or stories about courage or kindness or little lessons. I don't know. fond memories.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, that's beautiful. Okay, can you finish this phrase? Most people think Lorin Latarro dot dot dot. But the truth is

Lorin Latarro:

Depends who knows me from where but most people think more material is super competitive. Um, you know, from dancer days, but the truth is, I I could create stories for no money with a group of kids on an island and have another 10 children of my own and be pretty happy.

Lisa Hopkins:

Alright, just before I let you go, I'm gonna say the word you let me know what it conjures. And that's it. All right. So what makes you hungry

Lorin Latarro:

chocolate

Lisa Hopkins:

Sad,

Lorin Latarro:

loneliness.

Lisa Hopkins:

Inspired,

Lorin Latarro:

reading,

Lisa Hopkins:

frustrated

Unknown:

making choices.

Lisa Hopkins:

Hmm. Why is that?

Lorin Latarro:

Just Just having to having to make one or the other choice is just growing up knowing you can't just do everything all the time. It can't be in five places at the same time. Have to choose one place.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Make sense? What makes you laugh?

Lorin Latarro:

My husband and my daughter?

Lisa Hopkins:

What makes you angry?

Lorin Latarro:

injustice and hypocrisy

Lisa Hopkins:

and what makes you feel grateful?

Lorin Latarro:

my parents

Lisa Hopkins:

very cool. What are the top three things that happened so far today?

Lorin Latarro:

A really fun morning with my daughter. A very meaningful and really sharp run through of Waitress and a meeting about Waitress with a glass of wine over the with the creative team that I love very much.

Lisa Hopkins:

Oh, that's great. And Sara is going back in right?

Lorin Latarro:

She's in and she's gonna be amazing.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, she's incredible.

Lorin Latarro:

And talk about a kind person. She is. Really.

Lisa Hopkins:

Your energy is beautiful.

Lorin Latarro:

Awe thanks

Lisa Hopkins:

No, absolutely beautiful. I mean, you just you radiate. And this is a friggin like two dimensional thing. So I just want to thank you for showing up. And I'm not surprised. You know, I'm not surprised that you showed up in the way you did.And I'm gonna let you go. But I so appreciate you.

Lorin Latarro:

Thank you so much. Best of luck with everything. Please stay in touch.

Lisa Hopkins:

i will, Go read to that little girl.

Lorin Latarro:

I will. Bye bye.

Lisa Hopkins:

I've been speaking today with Lorin Latarro. I'm Lisa Hopkins. Stay safe and healthy everyone and remember to live in the moment. In music, stop timing, beautiful moment where the band is suspended in rhythmic unison, supporting the soloist to express their individuality. In the moment, I encourage you to take that time and create your own rhythm. Until next time, I'm Lisa Hopkins. Thanks for listening