STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.

David & Liz Josefsberg: Loving, Living & Laughing

October 19, 2021 Lisa Hopkins, Wide Open Stages Season 5 Episode 1
STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.
David & Liz Josefsberg: Loving, Living & Laughing
Show Notes Transcript

Season 5 Kicks off with this lively conversation with dynamic duo Broadway star and Broadway Breathwork coach David Josefsberg and his wife, Liz Josefsberg health guru of the stars and author of Target 100

This lively episode is filled with love, and laughter as David & Liz  share their passion for helping and healing.  A true "power couple", they speak candidly about their roles as parents, partners and performers and how they played  Marius and Cosette in Les Mis and were warned by friends to stay away from each other!

Guest Bios

David Josefsberg has appeared Broadway shows as Les Miserables, Grease, The
Wedding Singer, Motown, Honeymoon in Vegas, An Act of God, Waitress, The Prom,
and most recently Beetlejuice and is a personal trainer, a health coach, and most recently a Breathwork instructor. Visit his website here: David Josefsberg

Liz Josefsberg  is a health, wellness, and weight-loss expert with over 20 years in the industry.
Liz worked for 11 years as the DIrector of Brand Advocacy and a leader for Weight Watchers,
until she started her own consulting firm as a wellness expert. Liz counsels both high-profile
talent and everyday clients in all areas of weight loss, balance and nutrition.  Find out more here: https://www.lizjosefsberg.com/

Support the show
Lisa Hopkins:

This is the stop time podcast. I'm your host, Lisa Hopkins and I'm here to engage you in thought provoking motivational conversations around practicing the art of living in the moment. I'm a certified life coach, and I'm excited to dig deep and offer insights into embracing who we are and where we are at. So I am so, so excited to speak with my next guests. David and I spoke a little over a year ago in July 2020 in season one, episode eight and if you're a Broadway fan, then chances are you've been lucky enough to see him on stage in I don't know, lame is Grease, The Wedding Singer, Motown, Honeymoon in Vegas, An Act of God, Waitress The Prom and most recently Beetlejuice, which played his final performance March 12 2021. when Broadway shut down. Also joining us today is David's other half Liz Josefsberg, who is nationally renowned wellness and weight loss expert well known for helping Oscar winning actress and musician Jennifer Hudson, lose weight and transform her life. She also helped Jessica Simpson shed over 50 pounds of baby weight twice. Others celebrity clients include Charles Barkley, Katie Couric, and Suzy Orman so lucky for us, Liz also coaches everyday folks in all areas of weight loss, balance and nutrition She has appeared on Good Morning America, the dr. oz show Oprah Winfrey and more. And she's a much sought after speaker and panelist nationally and probably internationally. I'm just going to add that, because if she isn't she will be.I've been reading her fabulous book guys. It's called target 100. Even though I know this isn't meant to be a pitch thing. It's awesome. So shout out for that. It's wonderful. So welcome, you guys. We are so lucky to have this dynamic duo with us today. Really Welcome back, David, and lovely to meet you Liz.

Liz Josefsberg:

It's so nice to be here. Thank you for having me.

David Josefsberg:

Thanks for having us.

Lisa Hopkins:

Thanks for taking the time. I was so excited. David, when we last spoke, I think you had been put on pause for Beetlejuice and were just launching Broadway Breathwork if I if I remember correctly, you've come a long way. I know that. Tell me about that. I'm so curious about that space, because when we met everything was kind of ambiguous still with the whole thing, but I know that you had already started to shift.

David Josefsberg:

Yeah, absolutely. So on August 15, two days before my 50th birthday,I had my first class and about 50 people came and then I pretty much continuously did it almost every week every other week, sometimes three, three times a month and it's really been an unbelievable experience. I'm starting here too. It's just a dream as much as the Broadway was a dream at the time and I'm not here to say that it's definitely coming back but maybe Beetlejuice will be coming back at some point it's been just as amazing to be able to find this new avenue and this new arena to you know help people

Lisa Hopkins:

What's so beautiful about that too is because I again when I when we spoke I remember you you weren't doing it - much like me with the coaching- you weren't doing it instead of you weren't doing it as a replacement for you felt this passion and I think what you discovered if you know and I don't want to put words in your mouth but it sounds like what you discovered was that what you got from performing you could get elsewhere.

David Josefsberg:

Yeah, absolutely. It's so... I mean not only does it allow me to do that in addition to right so I get joy from singing I get joy from performing I'm still doing some things with I think I was doing sessions with Josefsberg then, where I would do a weekly little sing along and I'm still doing that. But then I get this other side of sharing and communicating and connecting with people and helping them get better and helping me get better and it's just like Lizzy would always say that I like I like lots of things all at once. Like if I'm having food I like to have you know different lots of little different things.

Liz Josefsberg:

If we go to a restaurant, like he wants to order everything on the menu and share it

David Josefsberg:

So I'm sort of getting to do that a little bit.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, and share it right? That's what I love. Because some people want to order everything on the menu but don't really want to share it. So that's -that's you. And David you're joy. I mean, you're just joy would be the word I would use to describe you. You spread joy and you share it, it's beautiful. It really, it really, really comes through just and we don't know each other that well and I just you know, I just want to honor you for that, seriously.

David Josefsberg:

Thank you. I have a lot of gratitude about that.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, no, absolutely. And so Liz, I understand that you before you became this fitness guru, this help guru that you also were working on Broadway singing and acting. Tell us a little bit about that and, and also sort of what your transition was. I know it wasn't recently. But I'm

Liz Josefsberg:

I mean, it was a huge part of my life. I was really curious about that space and what sort of helped you professional, you know, singer, singer Actress for 10 years, I started singing very early and had just a lot of really strong feedback and kinda was pushed in that direction. I ended up going to music school at DePaul University and then I got my master's degree in opera at Manhattan School of Music. And from there I started doing some operetta and then, you know, was was pretty quickly pivoted into very operatic musicals, Magnolia in Showboat, Cosette in Les Mis you know, these high "C" pivot? singing, but I loved it and spent 10 years doing doing that traveling doing national tours. That's where I met David, you know, we went on as Cosette and Marius one day and that was like, Huh, I feel something weird going on. So so it was a wonderful part of my life. As we met and my priorities started to shift I was getting into my 30s I was ready to just sort of I was like auditioning and hating it I was getting very anxious like I would go to an I would have like a full on panic attack for an audition whereas it used to be like I'd walk in and I didn't care you know, and it became more and more unpleasant. It just kind of was like I just didn't want to do it anymore. And it was a really hard realization to make more so because I think that people in my life were so embedded in it you know, my family my parents they loved to be able to tell their friends to go see me in a show and it was like that was that was more important to everyone else and it was so it was a very hard shift for me to make oh it actually happened one day that we were going to go audition for something together and I just it was for Grease - Sandy in Grease I remember like yesterday. I was just like oh my god I can't go like I'm not Sandy. I can't belt I don't know why I'm going in for this like I had a full meltdown and I was like oh my god it's done I'm done. And I didn't know what it was going to do that's for sure. But I had struggled with my weight my whole life so like i was i was overweight from the time I was 12 I was in diet programs as a child I was very messed up especially then being an actress I was very very body dysmorphic I would over exercise I would under eat I would do any diet I could get my hands on so as I came out of acting I gained a lot of weight because finally there was no one looking at me right so it was like I was free he loved me we were getting you know we were married I ended up going to Weight Watchers then at the time and I had never done Weight Watchers before. So I went in that room and had to listen to other people talking about their their relationship with food and I realized like oh my god mine is a mess but it was really in talking and listening and those groups that I started to kind of shift and go oh this isn't about a food plan this is about what I've learned my thoughts and behaviors around food. This is not about diet so I ended up becoming I just said I'm going to get a job here and I started working at the lowest level of the company I was making like minimum wage and I loved it because I was talking one to one so as a person steps up on a scale in front of you they get so vulnerable and so

Lisa Hopkins:

You mentioned two moments in your life where you honest but what I saw was they also got so mean to themselves and it like broke my heart and it really became this moment that changed me because I was like wait a minute This can't be like how we think about ourselves and weight and our our bodies and it kind of like planted a seed from there I ended up you know really working my way up through the ranks of of the the company I became a leader and then I worked my way up to be their sort of celebrity weight loss guru and their national spokesperson I stopped working there now eight years ago after 11 years working in every aspect I worked on the science team I wrote the weight loss programs I worked in the rooms I was their national spokesperson and then I was like you know what, it's time for me to go find out something more about weight loss so kind of went back to school got more certifications became a personal trainer just really dug in on the science behind this and the side of the brain science more than anything else was what really was because that was that moment right those those those people stepping on that scale filled with guilt and shame and and wondering like why would we do those things to ourselves and where did we learn that behavior? And what was that? What was the result of that? And so in studying our brain I started to learn that like oh my gosh, that Makes you actually eat more when you feel guilt and shame, the brain turns on this reward system. And you actually go in and do the thing that you didn't want to do. where you just stopped and said, I'm not going to do this one one was, you know, the Grease, audition, you know, where you just suddenly, I mean, that was the moment. But that's where, where you were able to sort of take control of your life, which I think is really, really interesting. And then, and then the other was when you because and you didn't know what you were going to do, which is really cool. And then you you've forged this whole journey of learning, of learning about yourself and all of that. It sounds like the real aha moment for you was when you saw the people stepping on the scale. And I'm so curious to know, did that resonate in you similarly to the audition panel, like the gatekeepers, that the voices of the industry and your people that love you that want to put you in a silo because they understand what a Broadway performer is? That they don't understand what someone on their journey to find themselves is? Talk to me about the similarities or differences or if that lands for you at all?

Liz Josefsberg:

Yeah, I mean, it really does, I think it's it was the way that it manifested for me is, I can only talk about it sort of physically, like, it was almost like I wanted every ounce of my body, and my brain and my being wanted to help people.And I couldn't connect to that in theater anymore. It wasn't, it wasn't feeding that that that piece of me who just literally, like if I could make somebody's day better for one second, if I could make them see something differently about themselves for one second, then I was alive. And what had happened is that theater had started to feel very dead. For me, it felt like it was self serving, I was doing it for other people. And that it didn't, it didn't bring me joy. And I couldn't be helpful if I couldn't bring joy. So I felt very shut down. versus when I sat there helping a person standing in front of me, I felt completely connected to the universe to myself to them. And it made me feel totally alive. And I didn't care if I was making minimum wage, I didn't care I was joyful going into that job every single day. But it was operating from from my, my gut, if you will, that's what it totally is to like,

David Josefsberg:

I was thinking, you know, am I ever going to give up theater fully? I don't know. Because it does bring me joy. And so if it brings me joy, it does have that healing capacity for other people as well, if it's my true joy, and then I was thinking about the how you said that the the connection between the three, with your coaching it's trying to find that neural pathway, that's the thing with breath work, you're shutting off the that mean voice, you can get to that voice that you're the positive voice and with target 100 it literally was about life and about so much more than just nutrition. These are the things that you have to get to the deeper pathways. It's all just connected. It's all the same kind of stuff. And it's awesome.

Lisa Hopkins:

Can you take me back just a little more to to when the both of you met you said you met in the show. I'd love to sort of hear you. Yeah. And feel free to jump in. And if you feel differently, again, like I am, I don't know.

Liz Josefsberg:

It's it's always been how I operate. But I actually I was not looking for love when I met Dave and like that was just not in my like purview at all. I but interestingly, when he was coming, he was coming out just to fill in for the understudy of Marius for just a seven week period. And I was out on the road and solidly there. Some women were talking about him. The

Lisa Hopkins:

hilarious Marius?

Liz Josefsberg:

In Les Mis before this, okay, and he had a real reputation like as, as a very, very big dog.

David Josefsberg:

Okay okay now....

Liz Josefsberg:

And so they were talking about it. Before he even got there and I wasn't paying attention. They were sort of over and I was putting on my makeup getting ready for the show. And they said his name is David Josefsberg. And the hair on the back of my neck stood up. I was like, That's weird. I didn't think much about it.

David Josefsberg:

And I was at home with a good friend who was just out there who said Listen, do anything you want. Just stay away from Liz Watts,

Liz Josefsberg:

which was my maiden name. He and he was like, you know, we were starting to kind of like you know, just chat a little bit.

Lisa Hopkins:

Did he say why you should stay away from her?

Liz Josefsberg:

Cuz he liked me. And he wanted to date me.

David Josefsberg:

Well, I mean, it wasn't a dating. He was dating somebody too so they had a little flirty relationship so ....

Liz Josefsberg:

so yeah basically honestly we became friends because as I say I wasn't really looking for

David Josefsberg:

But wait, what was the first thing when I came up here was like Hi I'm David something I'm supposed to stay away from you or

Liz Josefsberg:

Yes yeah so cheesy

David Josefsberg:

What a bad ... I mean this was... I was younger please please forgive me for all this!

Liz Josefsberg:

so anyway I as I say I was not looking for this I was like actually actively trying to like not pay attention to these this feeling of like this guy's funny. He's cute. So I would actually go back at night and tell him the women that we're talking about him like I was like, okay, so basically there's this woman, she really likes you Her name is you know...

David Josefsberg:

So she set me up with all these other girls that keep me away from her.

Liz Josefsberg:

Like to deflect. So long story short, by the end of the seven weeks, we did go on I was a Cosette understudy at the time he was a Marius understudy. And one night they got sick, and we went on and I've been kind of denying all these feelings. And that night I got off stage I said to my best friend, I was like, I don't know why that was I like felt those songs. And like the craziest way I've never felt that before. And it was sort of that moment of, you know, really feeling it. Long story short, he felt none of that!

David Josefsberg:

That is not true! Come on. I felt - I was young in theater. I didn't necessarily feel like oh, I'm ready for something huge. But I felt the feelings.

Liz Josefsberg:

Yeah, so we started dating. Yeah, we had our ups and downs in the dating. He didn't really understand what it was to date one person. So he had to learn that.

David Josefsberg:

Look at us now though. "If the could see us now...."

Lisa Hopkins:

What's shifted for you David, how did you learn and like how much later was it?

David Josefsberg:

Um, she wrote me a letter.

Liz Josefsberg:

Do you have that letter?

David Josefsberg:

I don't it's not I don't know who it is. But she wrote me a letter saying like she it started like "I woke to an emotion with the sun shining" and basically telling me that I'm never going to live a full life or a life that any meaning if I don't get my shit together,

Liz Josefsberg:

I did I was like yeah, like I can actually see who you are.

David Josefsberg:

And we framed it and hung it up in our apartments.

Liz Josefsberg:

I could see this person and that he was just totally not living at this like that he had so much to offer, but just thought like, it was totally just not. Yeah, like how you're behaving at all.

David Josefsberg:

This was also I mean, we can go into deep This was after we had a little incident. And then she was going to do a concert up in Canada for a fiance of hers who had passed away from cancer when she was young. And so after we got the letter, we became we were starting to chat again. This was this was a few months. And we're like, no, this is done like I'm done with you. And I said, Hey, I'd really love to support you and come up there and be your friend. And you allowed me to do that.

Liz Josefsberg:

I did.

David Josefsberg:

And then I slept on the floor. And then on the third day, we just had a moment and

Liz Josefsberg:

All was changed.

David Josefsberg:

All was changed.

Liz Josefsberg:

We never looked back.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Wow.

David Josefsberg:

I mean, it's not all been a bed of roses. I'll tell you but still.

Lisa Hopkins:

What a great story. So fast forward to you got married. Did you propose David or did she have to like, you know, whip you into shape?

David Josefsberg:

No, I actually I did a pretty good job. I was in Les Mis, and everyone in Les Mis helped me Actually we had taken a trip up to California to Big Sur. And we, right we we had seen it. Yeah, we've seen it. And then somehow I got her out there. Took her up to Big Sur and she didn't even realize what was happening. Because there was a stream in the back of this Big Sur River Inn and I was there she said she still didn't even know when I was about to get on my knee. So it worked out pretty well. Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

And you guys have been married how long now?

Liz Josefsberg:

20 years in April.

Lisa Hopkins:

Oh, wow. That's amazing. That's just amazing. And you have? Do you have two boys?

David Josefsberg:

Two boys.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. And how old are they?

David Josefsberg:

16 and 13.

Lisa Hopkins:

Tell me about how how that changed. Well just talk to me about your boys and the pandemic and

David Josefsberg:

Yeah, you want me to go first or you go first?

Liz Josefsberg:

We were talking just today about we feel very blessed. Like even during the pandemic that the boys were flexible. And they were they they did well in in all of it. But it's been terrifying as parents like you're so like, what am I doing? How am I doing? This is what is this going to do to them? Like what does it mean for them, but I just couldn't be more proud of the way that they've handled it. They stayed in sports, which I think really helps.

David Josefsberg:

And for me, you know, I have been lucky enough to be working for the last few years, which is not always normal. I'm always you know, a lot of times she's super busy and I'm doing daytime dad, but then it's been getting harder and harder because they have stuff to do all day and I'm working at night. So being able to be my youngest baseball coach and being able to work out with my oldest this has been some of you knowIt's sad not to be able to do that job that I've been doing all my life but that has been a huge positive for, for us too.. like for as a family to be able to have dinner for me. Some of my favorite moments or even just working out with Cooper during the day or doing the or coaching Benji has been supremely awesome

Lisa Hopkins:

yeah well and at that age I mean at any age honestly with a child that that amount of time there's so much change normally but it's not usually you're not usually with it minute to minute right every it's it's a different focus because you were you were sort of watching them grow like like a plant right?

David Josefsberg:

yeah

Liz Josefsberg:

yes day in and day out.

Lisa Hopkins:

So how was that different?

Liz Josefsberg:

It's so different especially for me too. I mean, I've been on this trajectory where sometimes I was traveling you know every week all the way to LA and back you know really really busy. We were relying on his parents you know, we were you know, and this was just like a full stop immediate full stop. And I don't think we had really realized how like crazy our lives had become I mean, we would pass a baton like I would be coming in from the city and like he would like pass the baton of like okay Benji needs to go here they need dinner he needs his homework done and we were like See ya like and not see each other he's not home on the weekends. So I'm doing all the weekend stuff like it was exhausting like and I think that that in that way that's been such a blessing, you know, to be together and to see each other and I think you know, there was a there was a beautiful article written where they they interviewed children and their number one thing about the pandemic that they reported they were happier about was being with their parents more often. And I could see that in both the boys especially with David you know, it's hard being a mom of two boys because I don't really like to play ball I don't like to play video games,

David Josefsberg:

I'll do it all day long.

Liz Josefsberg:

You know so i would look out in the pandemic and I'm up in my office and they're out there playing basketball and I'm like crying like this It just wouldn't have been able to happen.

David Josefsberg:

Yeah the change in us about worrying so much about the school and this and that I feel like that is pulled back of like you know what, they're going to be fine and they're going to make their choices and they're going to you know, if they don't go what they'll they they can choose to work their butts off and get into the school that they want to and make us pay that $400,000 or whatever it is or they can do something else and that's fine too and I feel like that's allowed them to really shine - be themselves right and it really did like ever It was like almost like getting caught up in a whirlwind of of not keeping up with the Joneses but oh should we be doing this and should we be doing that and and all that just dropped they can go to school in their bedroom and have a good life and like have their friends and play and and so it just took down all of that of like you know what, as long as they're happy like we don't need anything else There it is the joy!

Lisa Hopkins:

it sounds like you've made a lot of discoveries during this time that's pretty exciting and and and like you've described in your lives like they were there already you know, this just shed light on them earlier maybe then you would have recognized them and you're in a different position therefore you've taken a different action and that's pretty cool. What is your definition of living in the moment?

David Josefsberg:

what I feel right this second which could be different from what I wrote yesterday (

Liz Josefsberg:

cuz you were being in the moment....

David Josefsberg:

is that it's not running, not running on these on this on an identity or beliefs that were you were living in the past on experiences and how you acted in those moments, and not worrying about the expectations and what the future is going to bring. Just living your joy and your authenticity now which will then make whatever that that expectation the future perfect because it is. I always think for for me the definition of living in the moment is that ability to erase the chalkboard, like if you imagine a chalkboard in front of you and your brain just is constantly throwing out all this, this the story and all of these reasons and all of all of this, you know, they're just like, it's like almost like creating a whole reality in front of you. That is not happening right now. For me to be in the moment, I got to be aware that that my brain is a machine and it has a job and that I can just go in and erase the chalkboard and I imagined myself with an eraser just taking all of that stuff off and I take a deep breath and I actually connect physically to myself where I am. And what that does, it just re centers me and it takes it out of that realm of like the any of those things that I thought were going to happen in the next hour to six weeks are even true. Because they're not true. They're not happening now.

Lisa Hopkins:

No, absolutely.

David Josefsberg:

That's my, my way of arriving, or my definition of being human is truly just stopping everything. And I do it 50 times a day. Yeah, probably.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Liz, what would you say is one of your strongest attributes?

David Josefsberg:

And I'm going to make sure to judge to see if it's good. Yeah, I would say probably just knowing who I am. Yes, not really ever been a question. And I know who I am. I know. You know, it's very rare that I don't know exactly what i i feel about something. I'm not confused very often. And I react very in a very authentic way. And I just kind of follow that. So it's been a it's been just sort of knowing what I want to do next. Someone once said to me, like, it seems like you seem to see like all life is like the disco floor, like, you know, with the light up squares. And you just seem to know where you want to step into next, which one's going to light up next for you. And it doesn't mean I'm on the path, right? Like, I've changed course many times. It just sort of, I'm like, I know I want to do this now. So I think that's probably a strong.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, that's beautiful. It sounds like you. You trust the process?

David Josefsberg:

Yeah, like David marrying David. Like, once I met him- Smartist thing she ever did! Best thing I ever did. But I said this to him literally over coffee the other day of like, I just, I don't ever doubt my, you know, when I make commitments, when I make decisions, they're they're from a very true place and valleys. It doesn't mean they'll always work out. It's gonna work out.

Lisa Hopkins:

No what's really cool about that, too, though, is that you know, I would add, if I may, you know, going back to what you what you said, which was that you basically you know, yourself that you're confident, it's not so much about, I mean that that's your signpost for making decisions. But what it harkens back to me is what you told me what you shared about when you knew what wasn't for you, but you didn't know what was ahead. But you were okay with that. That is your superpower right there.

David Josefsberg:

Yeah, yeah, the floor doesn't. Lights don't turn on. She turns the lights on the disco floor. And then that's the path.

Lisa Hopkins:

I love it. I love it. And you'll stand as long as you want on the in a given in a dark light and be okay. Yeah. No, I see that.

David Josefsberg:

I'm dancing around on all the squares. I don't know what the hell I'm doing. I'm like on all those squares.

Lisa Hopkins:

Try to trying to be fair to each square.

David Josefsberg:

Yeah, exactly. Right. Yeah. You okay, square? You Okay.

Liz Josefsberg:

For all the squares.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Well, what would you say David is one of your strongest attributes?

David Josefsberg:

I've that I like that word. I mean, I think I I never even say the word compassion. But I would you said it before. And then she just said it. I feel like that is that that's the word that sort of encompasses, like, wanting everyone to feel good and joy and caring about others. And that's what brings me joy. So that's good, because it helps. It's, you know what I mean? That's what fills me up. So I'm not really doing it to be nice. I'm doing it because it's filling me up.

Lisa Hopkins:

So yeah. So Liz, what would you say? Is one of David's strongest attributes?

David Josefsberg:

Oh, no. I think it's just the literal enjoyment of whatever is going on. Like, I have a job. Oh, I don't have a job. Oh, I like there is no, it's just like, what can What fun can we have here? It's the ability to find find that joy in every space of like, Oh, this is the greatest thing that ever happened to me. Right? Like and then you know, I'm thinking about just your, the conversation that you just had of like, he literally goes into a show or not in a show, you know, even now is not in a show, but he's always creating new best friends. And people love him and come to really feel like, you know, they are best friends. And that is sort of his superpower, which is just to connect with people and be joyful in in every moment. Like people are like, this is the worst thing that's ever happened and Broadway is closed. He's like, I'm having a time in my life. I'm like, that's so David. It's so David. And it makes being married to David so easy because there's never a time where I mean you would think like, oh, his whole career went down in one day and he's not going to he's going to be upset and I'll be propping him up and helping, not up not for a second. He's like, what kind of adventure ride are we on now Let's do this next thing. That' fun. Yeah. Yep, that makes tha I would say that definitely hi ability to enjoy every moment

Lisa Hopkins:

That's awesome. Do you see that as something that's different from you like, do you think you'd benefit - or not - from having more of that in in your sort of trajectory?

David Josefsberg:

Oh certainly Yes. Like I am very much more you know, I was much more like needing control I that's something I've really moved away from but and the pandemics helped it a lot to have, like, just, you know, enjoy every moment that you have, but it's not as natural to me, it's just so natural for David. So I tried to kind of sponge off of him. But I'm not it's not always successful. Sometimes I become resentful of that. I'm like, really, really? Alright. What about the bills, who's gonna pay the bills, you know, like, I'm very practical, very down to earth very, like, I'm very much like, I plan things, you know, so I'm not as in the moment and joyful with everything. Which makes us a kind of a good dude. Because he pulls me out of my seriousness, or my plan fullness or my control, and I pull him a little bit along, and you've taught, I mean, you've in so many, you've taught me so much, I wouldn't be able to do the breath, or I wouldn't be able to do any of these things. If she wasn't, if you weren't there behind me to help to teach me and help me. And I think that we both I was thinking of your words of like strength and your ability to make decisions and to take imperfect action. And that was, what was it? We were having coffee two days ago, you're like, do I give you enough? Because I'm so independent. I said to him, I was like, I hope that that I've never left you wanting because I am so self-dependent. You know, and he's so opposite, right? So connection and love and needy, you know what I mean? You know, and I think that that was the third word is your ability to be open and to remain open and to even just asking that question is you grew up, like, changing and growing into this, besides having all these other things, and that's what that's the word that I that I think that is pretty amazing. Yeah, it's, it's something you just want to like, it just felt so natural, because he is so connected. And I'm like, always just like, I hope I don't cut you down. Like I don't cut off connection sometimes because I am so like, working and this and I gotta do this, and I gotta I'm like, so internal sometimes. And that so that was that that moment of like self reflection of desire to, to connect.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, that's beautiful. here's the here's the big question. Well, I think it's big. I mean, it can be big, which is, how, how do you want to be remembered?

David Josefsberg:

You have to go first this time ... As kind. Hmm. I think if someone would say that I made them feel better, and find the kindness within themselves to be kinder. People are really afraid to be nice to themselves and say what they've done right versus what they've done wrong. That that would be my greatest legacy to know that I made someone feel that they could be kinder to themselves.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. Oh, absolutely. What about you, David?

David Josefsberg:

I don't know I was I was thinking of like, I guess my brain has now at this moment has gone to like my kids, like how they would remember because like people, okay, others I don't. I love kindness is one of my favorite words for sure. But I think, I guess passing on to my kids, or I guess anyone who sees it is to, don't do things because you think you have to but to be someone who lives away where to live your joy and to live things that bring you joy and you can change and not to be afraid to step into something new because life is so short. So you shouldn't spend a moment not doing something. What will bring you to your eventual joy, order joy, you know what I mean to to as someone who with kindness, lives his joy. I think it's interesting that you brought up the children in that in that. I think that's what we're striving for as parents very hard now is to just let them find their joy, you know, especially as they get this 13 & 16 year old time of you know, don't feel like you should do this you have to do that you have to go to college you have to do get this great or you have like just like I I want them to find their way and you you know because it was mostly different you know right for us know it was like you go to college you do this you do that you does it not for everybody obviously but I really think that it's there's so many different paths and so many different things that I really hope that you know, they'll they'll see us doing that and see the and do that. And all people all people .

Lisa Hopkins:

yeah, no, for sure. gonna ask you what's your idea of a perfect date night? Do you have a quick answer for that?

David Josefsberg:

Yeah, well, you know what we're sort of like in the middle of doing different things now because like we're trying not to drink as much through the pandemic. But it used to be like a 24 hour, we've become like, the experts at popping into the city doing a 24 hour date all over the place like or like eating, having a drink at night. Then in the morning waking up and running Central Park or doing something that would be a workout, there'd be food, there'd be a thing the next day in the morning for breakfast, healthy breakfast, and so we'd have maybe a movie or meditation somewhere and it's like a full 24 bath 24 hours and like knocking it out.

Unknown:

We're like gonna write a book called The perfect 24 hour vacation.

Lisa Hopkins:

Oh, that's great. Oh, I'm glad I asked you that that. Yeah, no, that's awesome. Okay, great. Can you finish this phrase? Most people think David Josefsberg is dot dot dot. But the truth is ...

David Josefsberg:

I mean, we can go with I mean, there's probably many ways but most people think David Josefsberg is like this funny, funny guy. But the truth is that he really thrives and wants the connection and to know people and to find deeper intricacies.

Lisa Hopkins:

That's cool. What about Liz?

David Josefsberg:

This is like totally stumping me. I don't know, most people probably think. I think I think they think that the things that I do come easy, right? Like that I make things look easy. Whereas they don't. There is a lot of thought and processing and work behind the scenes and study and all of these things. But I tend to kind of like just get out there and make it look like it's just all kind of taking place. I don't know not my best answer of my life.

Lisa Hopkins:

It's a great answer! Oh no, you make things look easy.

Unknown:

People would think like Oh, she's just rolling along she like wrote a book and now she's doing this thing and she's doing this and now she's this. But it's really you know, you take spend a lot of time and energy and effort to do the things that look easy.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah, no, absolutely. All right. So here we go. Rapid Fire. What makes you hungry?

David Josefsberg:

Steak.Hey, I don't even..

Liz Josefsberg:

Potatoes

Lisa Hopkins:

What makes you sad? What

David Josefsberg:

makes me sad? My children in pain. People being mean to animals. Oh, yes.

Lisa Hopkins:

What inspires you?

David Josefsberg:

Lizzie! I guess that's what I said.

Liz Josefsberg:

Okay. Ah, the ocean. I also seeing people do what they do best.Mm hmm. Yeah, like Olympians like watching Olympians or watching like,

David Josefsberg:

Lizzie.

Lisa Hopkins:

That's awesome. Okay, what makes you feel frustrated?

David Josefsberg:

Not taking action when I should. little annoying things breaking like a dishwasher. Oh, I'm on the same wi everything's breaking in our house right now. Everything.

Lisa Hopkins:

What makes you laugh?

David Josefsberg:

Failing videos.

Liz Josefsberg:

Shelby, our dog is really goofy.

Lisa Hopkins:

What makes you angry David?

David Josefsberg:

What makes me angry? Well, when I feel like I'm doing like folding laundry and doing everything and I asked my children to just empty the dishwasher one time and they give me the business about it. Yeah.

Lisa Hopkins:

Fair enough.

Unknown:

Racism. Yeah, just like seething anger. And when people can't see racism when they don't have the ability to see That what they just said or did, like, is a totally horrible thing. And yeah, that makes me angry.

Lisa Hopkins:

Ignorance.

Liz Josefsberg:

Yeah, ignorance. ignorance.

Lisa Hopkins:

Yeah. And finally, what makes you grateful?

David Josefsberg:

Oh, so many things, I don't know that I can. Just being here, having this opportunity to, to, to experience everything. That's a little woowoo probably. But that's really the truth of how I feel. I'm definitely grateful for for the for the boys for being as flexible and malleable as they've been for our family, including your the extended family that we have. I think we're very lucky. and grateful I have a very strong support network around me in the project that I'm working on now. And sometimes they just sit back and go, like, how are these people believing in me and supporting me right now? I'm very, very grateful.

Lisa Hopkins:

That's awesome. And you've almost made it to the end. What are the top three things that happened today? Go. Today.

David Josefsberg:

Well, we had our morning, coffee chat, which is always walking chat I'm going to call is one that's going to get a lot of things, you know, just connection. So more in connection with life and dog. Getting a lot of wonderful things done on my list, which always makes me feel good, like little things and actions of little actions that I need to take to make things happen in the future. And oh, had a great workout. And now this this interview, because this has been super awesome. Super fun.

Lisa Hopkins:

Same. Liz, do you have a top three?

Liz Josefsberg:

Yeah, I'd say my run this morning was beautiful. The weather was perfect. This has been wonderful connecting with you meeting you. And I had my hair colored yesterday so I don't have a gray skunk stripe down my head and it was nice to blow dry my hair. Yeah.

David Josefsberg:

Did you have a lovely breakfast?

Liz Josefsberg:

No, not yet. I'm gonna eat right now.

David Josefsberg:

She's starving. Great shaking.

Lisa Hopkins:

Oh my gosh. You guys, thank you. I cannot thank you enough for joining me. Really. It's been brilliant.

David Josefsberg:

It was awesome.

Lisa Hopkins:

I'm speaking today with David and Liz Josefsberg. I'm Lisa Hopkins. Thanks for listening. Stay safe and healthy everyone and remember to live in the moment. In music stop time. It's a beautiful moment where the band is suspended and rhythmic unison, supporting the soloist to express their individuality. In the moment, I encourage you to take that time and create your own rhythm. Until next time, I'm Lisa Hopkins. Thanks for listening